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The Family File
Charles Rich Clark Journals
1886 - 1905

[1886] [1887] [1888] [1889] [1890] [1891] 1892 1893 [1894] 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 [1904] [1905] [Journal Main ]

1886

Jan. 1885
Hauled lumber from Hardscrabble and Sheep Canyon for a number of days.

Feb. 2-3, 1886
Fencing mill pond and surroundings.

Feb. 13, Sat. 1886
We went to Farmington.

Feb. 14, Sun. 1886
Went to Centerville after meeting.

Feb. 15, 1886
We went to Salt Lake, purchased furniture ($15.00). We drove back to Adda's. Emma's father brought Mrs. Tanner to Centerville on U.G.R.R.

Feb. 16-17, 1886
Back home bringing some trees and shrubbery and also visited Porters.

Feb. 21, Sun. 1886
Bro. D. Heiner, I, and folks visited Peterson.

Feb. 18, Sun. 1886
Quarterly Conference in Morgan.

Mar. 15, 1886
I & J.E.S. visited Enterprize.

Apr. 1, 1886
Went to Fast Meeting.

Apr. 4, 1886
I & D. Heiner preached in N. Morgan.

Apr. 7-8, 1886
Went to Grass Creek. Stormed. I left part of load of coal in Croydon.

Apr. 9, 1886
Purchased trees from Geneva Nursery. ($20.00)

Apr. 10, 1886
Helped E. Hunter survey for D. Heiner.

Bro. Woolley & Sister Maria Munn (Tanner) came to see us.

Apr 12, 1886
She went on cars with W.G. Philips.

May 15-16, 1886
Conference here. I had sold my team to J.E. Stevenson and walked over on Friday to Farmington. Saturday 15, I took a load of hay to Salt Lake City. Sunday morning at 5 o'clock I stated up riding with Father and Jos. E. Taylor (skipper), who returned in the afternoon.

May. 17, 1886
Being Water Master, I had the Canal cleaned taking 2-1/2 days, tax 60 cents per acre.

May 24, 1886
Watered lucern above Railroad and a piece of barley, lucern & timothy too.

May 18, 1886
Emma was sick at half her time. Dressed on 5th day.

May 27, Thurs. 1886
Emma on the train, went to Farmington , fare $21. Arrived all right.

May 29, 1886
Prepared to water barley this side of Coop as we have had a long dry spell.

May 31, 1886
Stormed a little. I and Bro. Hunter met and prepared part of Co. examination question. Took dinner with him and wife. In afternoon Croydon and S. Morgan played ball - 27 to 13.

June 1, Tues. 1886
Bought mare, bay, strip in face, 3 white feet, branded E.R. from E. Robison giving $20. cash.

$15. on P. Parkinson & 14 sk of flour. Have been trading a little with Jos. Williams & P. Parkinson on acct of receiving their store orders and their taking Mill produce & pork, but intend to do as little as possible. Am wanted to sell pieces of land to outsiders but don't like to although Prest. W. G. Smith gave his consent if I wished to giving the reason that they are already established here. I think the less established the better, however. I can lease. Bought wheat from Baldazgar Peterson @ 55 cents over 50 bu. Replanted potatoes. Stake & Seventies Priesthood meeting.

June 6, Sun. 1886
Read account of commencement Day exercises at University of Deseret. Wm. Alliso, Valedictorian. O.F. Whitney, Chancelor, his address and Gov. West's Speech. Attended Sunday School. My Bk of Mor. Class was called upon to review reading next. Attended Baptism. Ceremony given by Thos. Grover who has been officiating at the temple this year(for health)., " Having authority given me by Jesus Christ, I baptize you for the remission of sins, renewal of covenants, and the restoration of your health, Amen."

June 30, 1886
Conrad Smith and Hen. Rock returned from building Susan's house.

July 3, Sat. 1886
Mother, Mary Elizabeth, Anna, Mary Millard, Lucy,Rogers, Ezra and Birta came to visit us.

July 4, Sun. 1886
We visited Mr. & Mrs. T. W. Clark, Richville, and drove to Porterville, went to meeting, and returned at evening.

July 5, Mon. 1886
Celebration Day! About $70. was donated and appropriated. North and South meet at court house (2nd time used) at 10 o'clock and had oration, readings, music, recitations, songs, and children danced in afternoon. Refreshments were served. There was baseball. Dance at night.

July 6, 1886
Folks taking May and Amy as well as Miss Spakman, returned.

July 8, 1886
W. Worlton cut lucern for me. I sold 8 tons (nearly ) for $10. (3-1/2 ton) After finished stacking beyond where I wanted new yards to stand. S. C. Porter came along to sell me oxen. I promised him $90.00 note favor of J.D.S. and $110. out of mill.

Some are cutting 2nd crop of lucern to get 3rd.

Aug. 14, Sat. 1886
Albert coming from Coalville left wagon at Lost Creek and walked home leaving team in canyon. Dr. J. Woodsworth from Snake River came to look for his horse, stolen. I rode Corbitt's horse to E. Robison's and returned late.

Aug. 15, Sun. 1886
Attended Ward Priesthood meeting. The Bishop O. B. Anderson was anxious to talk to the young boys and the ones that did not come to meeting. I was called and set apart to visit them privately. I was to urge them to attend to the duty of Keeping Holy the Sabbath Day. Bro. Corbitt as a few minutes previous called and at the same time as I . He was set apart to visit the people from house to house and teach Sabbath observing.

After meeting Bro. Hunter said, "Well, you have a mission. Don't be afraid to put yourself forward. I have felt like being backward at times", he said, "but it isn't right."

Aug. 28, Sat. 1886
Attended City Council and became a member. I also qualified as Justice of the Peace of Second Ward a few days after.

Aug 29, Sun. 1886
Rec'd certificate from Bp. O.B. Anderson and counselors Geo. Heiner and E. W. Hunter to the effect that I was set apart and called "to take up a labor of love" with the young men of N. Morgan.
Father was arrested Wednesday morning Sept. 1 and went to the Pen. Feb. 24, 1887.

Nov. 13, 1886
Emma's recommend to the Logan Temple was written but she did not go.

Nov. 1886
Being president of the Y.M.M.I. of this Ward I did not like to be absent more than was necessary. J. E. Stevenson began running the mill for the winter.
I stopped teaching.
J.E.S. stopped running the mill

1887

May 27, Fri. 1887
Drove to Farmington. Arrived late. Met Bro. Woolley at Bp. Secrist's. Drove to Centerville then to Salt Lake and back. Bade. Ezra T. Stevenson good-bye for N. Zealand. Spoke in Centerville meeting house for second time. The first time was on last previous visit.

May 30, 1887
Alice Clark, aged then 16 yrs old came home with us and stayed 3 weeks. Became quite homesick, first time away.

June 18, 1887
Sold the Criddle mare and took her back to Salt Lake that night.

June 13, 1887
Emma was sick and went to bed, the day before she went to S.School but not to meeting with Alice. We attended S. School and special conference, S. Morgan. Alice did not like our Sunday School.

July 21-25, 1887
Emma was worse than she had been and nearly died. She vomited very bad in forenoon and from 11 till 4 or 5. Fainted several times when Bro. R. Fry and Jno Rich laid hands on her and began then to get better, but it took a long time to recover. Sister Smith W.D.'s wife , waited on her.
Emma was out for first time and went to Farmington on the Park City.
Went over the mtn past S. Brough's Mill to Centerville. Passed Walter Waldron with his mother and children and Mary Etta picking Service Berries.
Met Emma and Father who had been released from the Pen. on the 10th inst.
Came back over the mountain in 4 hrs.
On 24th attended Sunday school. Taught little boys of oral class for first time and Hannah Grover, the girls. Saints were told by telephone not to have 24th celebrations on account of Pres. Taylor's dangerous condition of health. We learned that he died @ about 8 p.m.

July 25 - 30, 1887
J.W.Stewart, Jr. cut first crop of lucern.
Sanford C. Porter took a sack of wheat from the mill platform. I rode to E. Porterville and found the sack in Anthon Peterson's wagon.
Drove to Farmington with bran and flour. Heard that Prest. W. G. Smith was arrested on the 27th.
Went to lake for salt. Had a bath. Took out honey.
18,000 people view Pres. Taylor, 78 yrs, 8 mos, 24 days old.
Returned home.
Attended S.S. Visited some of my class to get them to come. Told Bp. O.B. Anderson I did believe there was a great deal of superstition about the number 7 which this year is noticed.

Aug. 1, 1887
Swore out a complaint against S.C. Porter.
Mr. France of Mt. Green has-----young's jersey cows and says 3 cows will make 25 lbs butter per week.

Oct. 5, 1887
Went to Farmington on over the mountains. Conference in Salt Lake City April 6 -10. First for 3 years in S.L.C. Went to Conference. About 15 minutes after Emma learned that she could come on the eleven train but was too tired. I went to all the meetings of the 4 days except S..S,Union when we went to theatre of home Dramatic Co. Play was "Storm Beaten". Saw Apostle Woodruff on the afternoon of the last day whose appearance on the stand was applauded by the crowded house. His first appearance for nearly 3 yrs in public.

Erastus Snow preached the forenoon of Sat. the day before and the deputies searched for him in the afternoon. At the priesthood meeting at night he preached again. Being late on account of going slow with Emma to Orson Rogers Residence, back of Prest. Young's buildings where Pres. Young used to have his garden. When I came to the gates I found them locked. I climbed the wall at the center of the north side. It was said in this meeting that there had been a jealously about any brother starting in business and the outside element had got considerable of the trade. It was recommended that the young be taught to branch out. Manual labor on the part of the young was encouraged here and in the regular meetings.

There was little or nothing said about polygamy. The preaching was confined to the first principles of the gospel quite well. The "News" said it was more practical than doctrinal.

Oct. 19, Wed. 1887
The Y.M.M.I.Association held our first meeting held our first meeting. About 20 present. C.R. Clark Pres., D.A. Robison and Benj. Smith counselors. A.B. Goodrick secy.

I888

May 30, Wed. 1888
(I have been neglecting my record)
In the starting of the mutual meetings I was so particular about having a reorganization that there was a misunderstanding, some thinking that I was not satisfied with them as officer and thought I was taking this measure to try and get someone else in their places. It has been the custom of quite a large number of associations to re-organize at the beginning of each season and I thought it would give us a fresh start but had no idea but that the same officers would be sustained except in the case of a new secretary which had to be voted for. I realized afterwards that I should have waited for the (county) stake supt. To come and take charge but this could not be expected early. I believe I satisfied the officers of my true feelings but the affair caused delay in getting at the seasons work. There was a good season after.

During the winter of 87-88 I attended to the mill having N.J. Stevenson to help me who did so till spring when work became slack. The mill froze up four weeks perhaps in all. The water backed under the coop, sheds, and the mill pond was almost a field of solid ice. Some of J.W. Stewart's lucern was frozen out as a result and he wanted damages of about $50.00. He said others had apprised but Father was not in favor of paying anything. Father talked like he could not be responsible for the water running over. In this case he could not be reasonably as Stewarts water ditch carried the water and I notified him during the time and tried to stop it some. The water ran over quite bad in the tail race killing a little lucern.

This winter is the first one I have been out of the school room since a child. I have not yet succeeded in making myself as much interesting in milling as I should be to be the operative miller. I have not confined myself to one thing so much as I should and even now I should let outside work be more secondary though I have rented this year for half the lucern and one third the potatoes, except a little.

April 1888
We attended Conference. Emma went to every meeting. I came later on the train to Farmington and missed two days of conference. In the Priesthood meeting Lorenzo Snow presided. There was nothing specific given at the Conference. Some of the speakers referred to our people selling their Real Estate to outsiders as some had done at very high prices. Father was offered a high price for his lot. He was telephoned for to come down. He said that he didn't want any money. It was thought that the "boom" would be at its highest about June but when June came the "News" stated that things were in their normal condition. At Conference there was a meeting on the night before Conference closed which began a program to be carried out in an annual Conference to be started June 2nd & 3rd 1888.

On the eve of closing conference there was another meeting of the same kind private, Prest. W.W. and Asst. Sup't M. Thatcher were there. The latter said, "Learn to see, to hear, to know, but not to advertise." I went to Farmington but could have attended the second meeting if I had thought of the late passenger trains.

Brought back home some Poplar and Balm of Gileads and set them out along the sidewalk front of house.

June 3, 1888
On Friday night Bros Woodruff, Geor, Q., and M. Thatcher were at a private meeting in the Social Hall and all spoke. Gen'l Wells also said "Keep your guns bright and your powder dry." Bro. Cannon had not appeared before an audience for about three years except before the priesthood meeting at Conference at Logan. He was glad to see the time when it was not considered dangerous for members to become educated as in the early days of the church.

Bro. Thatcher related an incidence of Jno Morgan meeting an infidel in company with railroad officials, English capitalists and other men wherein the doctor brought up the incident of Moses leading Israel 40 years when a short course would have taken them. Bro. Morgan compared it with the 40 ft of entrails in the doctors.

Morgan was the best represented . More freedom. Looked for by Bro.. Woodruff.

Daniel Heiner and I had a pleasant visit that night at Spencer Clawson's. Stopped at Aunt Elizabeth's next night. Uncle Edward was there but left next morning for Logan to be on the underground. His son-in-law Bro. McDonald thought Uncle had traveled more than any other man in the church. Ezra Stevenson was in N. Zealand.

Visited Lizzie Wilcox. C. Wilcox thought of going East to study medicine.

Lucy and Eva were dress cutting teaching in Salt Lake and Alice Clark (sister) was attending Salt Lake City Stake Academy.

July 1888
The raid on violators of the Edmund tucker law continues.

Some think there will be a change soon. Jno E. Woolley was here for the first time about a week ago. He said that Jos. F. said that we would have to fight our course with the United States, make it appear that we are doing away with plural marriages.

A while after we get statehood we shall keep quiet on the matter and in 2 or 3 years the nation will have its attention attracted in another direction. Then we won't care.

July 9, 1888
Jn. Gibly, J.W. Stewart, Jr., and I turned more water by damming the river. There was much more water than I could use with both wheels.

July 16, 1888
There was not more than one half or third the water as a week ago. I put in a dam with J.W. Stewart in another branch of the river thus making all the river to come this way except what leaked through and what ….Coolhear used and then there was not enough when J.N. S. watered to run the Burns steady.

Commissioners or representatives from Ogden, Plain City and other places came up and held a meeting in the court house and the three canals of N. & S. Morgan each gave one third. This gave plenty of water for me but it failed afterwards.

July 20, 1888
Friday night Nephi Hardy, ……Brown, and ……….of the 4 water commissioners stopped with me. They did not get much water but said farmers would soon turn more down of their meadows. They said it rained on them on the 19th so on the night of the 20 the water increased to a good stream under the county bridge and this stream gave some to G.J. and J.G. Little and S. Francis though Francis had said to me his oats was far enough along without.

There was plenty of water after this increasing but not plenty for farmers. It was hard to raise water in the pond to let Edw. Gibby draw from the north corner to water our potatoes on the 19" of July, Aug, 5. There is four times the water in the river that I would need including what I have in the mill race.

Salt Lake had a fusion celebration on the 4th of July which kind had not been had for several years. It is to be remembered that Salt Lake had a fusion ticket this year in City election. Morgan City appropriated 25 dollars for brass band and $25 for citizens committee. There was no celebration in Morgan City presented on the 24th of July, but E. & W. Porterville and Richville celebrated at E. Porterville. I attended by riding the Tucker mare over, returning at noon. Emma said she celebrated by picking our currants all day. Bro. E.A. Richards called and said, "Well, you celebrated all alone today!"

Salt Lake had a celebration in behalf or in connection with the S.Schools. A startling announcement for the times was the opening address by Wilford Woodruff. The address proved to be written.

July 25, 1888
Primary meetings for Electing delegates to county convention to nominate candidates for Aug. 6 election were held.

I was disenfranchised by having refused to subscribe to an oath relating to the Tucker Edmunds law.

In the city ticket Jos. Williams was placed for councilor and Conrad Smith Justice on my place. My name had also been dropped at the same time E.W. Hunters was from the Board of Examination. Alonzo Francis and Alva Porter being instead. I could have been county surveyor.

July 31, 1888

Brig. Robison had young Hemming cut his and Sister Walton's wheat. It was ripe several days previous. Aug. 7 James. W. Stewart, Jr. had Thos. Grover cut his with a self binder. Will Croft, Enterprize, threshed. Nights are getting cooler Aug. 7

Aug. 7, 1888
Elections.
Emma Clark worked in Salt Lake Temple for Mary Stevenson, born 1826
                                Mary Stevenson, born 1852
                                Mary Stevenson, born 1805
She was baptized for them.

On Feb. 21, 1888 I was endowed for Edward Stevenson

May 27, 1889
Being one of 6 directors on the N. Morgan Irrigation Co., I went along the ditch to see about cleaning it and arranging for Enterprize to take out water by cleaning the ditch so as to carry more water. They were to enlarge to carry one fourth more water and pay one fifth tax after that agreement stands for ten years. I had said that the people have been paying more tax than needed if the ditch were worked right. I asked the question what the directors will clean out the ditch for and one spoke up saying they would give what was assessed (20cents per acre [418 acres]) We afterwards during the day agreed if I could contract with Enterprize to enlarge. I asked 40 cents per acre of 418 acres. They offered 30 cents and I agreed. I promised to have the water in by the next Saturday night (one week). The lucern was burning up and by the time Monday came I spoke to two of the directors and we agreed to have Jno. Trappet (Watermaster) turn in water right away to water lucern and he went Monday and Tuesday and turned in water Tuesday noon. I had some men working with plows, etc. 1-1/2 days and arranged the scraper so as to flush the light sediment.

May 29, Mon., 1889
I sent letter to Father asking him to come up so I had over three years ago given Geo. Heiner to understand that he could have a piece of land this side of Z.C.M.I., 80 ft by 11 rods (after was changed to 103 ft by 7 rods) for a piece of five or 6 acres each side of mill race and about $50.00 trade in this way. I had rec'd a pair of sleds for , I believe, 19 sks of flour to be rc'd when he furnished sacks. He was to give me $5.00 credit on his price some time when I purchased something. Father never liked the bargain and though G. Heiner occupied the land soon, I never had accepted anything and did not intend to do so until Father was satisfied and the bargain completed.

I have been visited by teachers and before the Bishop's court which decided that I must give the deeds within 30 days or appeal. I was not aware of the trial coming off as I had spoken to Pres. Smith and he said that if it were as I represented, he thought it ought to go before Father as Father had said for it to do in sending word by me. I appealed to High Council and told the whole affair as if I had been a disinterested person.

Aug. 18, 1889
There was the first rain which made water to run mill Aug. 24. There isn't enough to run steady with one wheel.

Oct. 1889
There is now enough to run steady.

When the University opened, I was there but did not go.

Dec. 1889
T.F. Welch had been working for me at 15 cents pr. Hour but the work is not crowding and I shall keep Arthur Brewer for awhile.

Dec 11, 1889
Repaired the platform of the mill putting two planks on top edge and one on outside.

Met D. Heiner who said that Pres. Smith (W.G.) had just told him that the authorities were uneasy about the condition of the work of the Lord and said Pres. Woodruff was advising that the Saints observe next Monday as a day of fasting.

Bro. Heiner said he had contracted for work on the foundation for a basement for a furniture and rooms for a hotel and perhaps pool and perhaps post office. He said the people talked discouragingly but if he got along with his family he would show that his motives are good.

Bro. Heiner told how he went in that dark low shoe shop where Jas. Tucker and J.R. Stuart were and had been for fifteen years. He thought we ought to do something to keep the business over here. The day before yesterday I saw surveyors camp down by the river by Bro. Fry's stack yard and yard of cattle. The preliminary survey ran on the other side of River Bridge, through Rob't Welch's barn that he bought from Chas. Criddle. So the R. Road won't benefit S. Morgan and Bro. Francis as so much perhaps as he hoped it would as he had intimated that he would put up store over in S. Morgan.

After doing part of my chores Sister Smith came. Not having my chores done at that late hour I had resolved to be punctual about my chores and seeing some of my folks gave impetus to the resolve as it makes me ashamed to have the folks learn of such a trait.

When Bro. Goddard was here he urged me to keep a journal and keep my acct closely watched to see how my business paid, etc. I resolved to do so and still intend to do so.

May the Lord help me to do better from now. Amen. Took (name missing) to Walters in the night.

Dec. 12, 1889
At the Weber sta. was a trunk and sack which I gave Geo. Heiner the checks for to bring to his office for me to receive after dark. This act I did after the Park City Express arrived bringing the baby carriage that did not get put on at Uintah. Purchased a pair of gaiters at Bro. Tucker's shoe shop. I could have bought an eastern shoe at the coop to suit better if it were not for my desire to sustain home manufacturer.

Dec. 13, Fri. 1889
Arrived 2:45 A.M. to take three of the family to Richville. Roads are muddy. Went over new county road from Jno. Dickson's to Wm. Dickson's.

Marion, Joda, Cottrell and I drove off about ten head of my cattle and some of Sis. Worlton's down as far as Mr. Lion's farm.

There has not any snow in the valley to lie on but much rain and considerable snow in the mountains.

Pet had the colic and I bled her in the mouth.

Dec. 14, 1889
Attended Seventies Meeting only about 20 there. Wm. Rich spoke well. Had lately been set apart Pres. since Daniel Heiner was taken into the High Council to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Bro. Card. Wm. Giles and …….Carter were added to the Quorum with others as to Sunday.

Purchased a mouth accordion for Marion ($1.30) as a Christmas present.

Jas. Tucker asked for terms for a lot between Heiner's and Campbells lots. Isn't decided because of R.R. prospect. Later He would give $5.00 but he did not wish to wait for reply.

1890

July 19, 1890
Attended People's Party primary meeting and was chosen Secy. S. Francis, Sr. Chairman. S. Francis had been mayor a good while but people did not with to speak their minds against him. Some were afraid it wouldn't do for to make a change as he was the best qualified. Pres. Smith thought a change should not. I told him we needed a change. In the meeting Geo. Heiner was nominated candidate as was also S. Francis. Voting was 23 to 23. The next time one person said he didn't want to vote for Geo. Heiner who the first time voted for S. F. and T. F. Welch told him not to vote either way.

Sept. 6, 1890
City Council met Geo. Heiner Mayor.

Went to Farmington and attended Stake Conference Sat. and Sunday.

Sept. 7, 1890
Went to Centerville with Bro. & Sis. Woolley and Jno., and Amy and walked back that night alone., the U.C.R.R.

Sept 8, 1890
Went to Salt Lake with Father, Mother, & Susan in the carriage. I succeeded in accompanying Father to see Jas. W. Wilson (Gte W.M. Co. Apt) at the Valley House Cottage. Father seemed more interested in a new mill at Weber than he had been. He asked for figures and setting them down said he might think about it and he afterwards told me he would come up.

Sept 9, 1890
Came to Ogden.

Sept 1890
Utah & Oregon lumber Co. quoted best rustic @ 4.00 but the Oregon No. @ rustic was @ 1.25 net cash. Oregon flooring 6 in wide or 4 in wide @ $3.50.

No. 1 flooring @ 4 cents cash. Culled 6 inch flooring soft from Trukee, culled @ 27.

Common surfaced boards @ 22 -1/2 cash down (Mill)

Nov. 22, 1890
Read a letter from T. F. Welch 43 Islington, Penton St., London N. He visited E. A. Brewer's Aunt.

Weather - We have had abundant water this season on account of heavy snow last winter. Early in the fall we had a large rainfall making good plowing but there is no snow in the mountains in the south side of the peaks. It is quite warm in the day. Last night after the frost was out of the mill pond soil I scraped dirt to fill up a cut in the bank used to drain the water from the potatoes put in by Wm. Worlton and tended by me assisted by Joda Cottrell @ $1.00 per day without board.

Emma is today preparing to be a pianist.

Last Sunday in the Stake Confer. Sisters Rich, Pres. of Stake Relief Societies and Sister Francis were called on to speak. This is the first incident of women being called on in Conference of the Stake of Zion. Sister Francis spoke on Woman's rights and Sister Rich on more general duties of Sisters.

Today is Woman's Suffrage meeting.

Nov. 26, 1890
Sold 1182 lbs pork in Salt Lake @ 7 cents, 125# being tithing
Bought at ZCMI 1 sk sugar725
25 currants
1 box raisins250
Tapioca200
1 keg syrum225
1 doz cans oysters300
3 cans salmon40
Lemon peal70
Stove elbow (@ D. James)85
Flat iron handle30
Isenglass , 3 for 10cents20

Dec. 13, 1890
Marvin was born

Dec. 31, 1890
While at Y.MMI.A. tonight I spoke in favor of keeping a diary. There were only seven of us there but the suggestion was favored, especially by D.A. Robison, A.E. Breuer, and Antone Himes. We also resolved to do so at the beginning of 1891 the eventful year elect with other resolves.

I feel especially enthused just now as I am filled with hope that I can do better. It has been hard for me to follow business in milling farming and when my aim is so much higher. The fact of the matter I never kept at school and since Prof. J. M. Tanner visited here 29 & 30 inst. Lecturing and since he is using his influence to get me to go East to school with him. I am once more intending to be what I have aimed to be. He lectured on "Painting for Bread."

1891

Jan. 1, 1891
Now comes another year.

We shall see what it will bring forth!

Will I do better in this year than in any of the 52/3 years that I have spent in Morgan? I would listen to those who are interested in me, I would not continue as I have been. They would rather see me teach school. Thos. Harding asked me today if I am going to school any more. I did not answer him but I would have taken a pride in saying, "I am!"

Did not attempt to celebrate the day. I had Marion ride the brown mare and I plowed the new part of the tail race so the water would wash it deeper after turning out most of the water at the head while W. Rollo sharpened the bucks.

I heard today that Eddington's son married D. Wadsworth's daughter.

Read today that Sitting Bull a few days ago was killed in cold blood.

We have had only about 4 in. of snow this winter. The mill hasn't frozen up.

I told Emma yesterday that if the Lord's willing I am going East to school, this resolve has revolved on my mind today. I feel as though I am not doing so well in life as I had hoped to do when I was younger. I am going to do better and pray the Lord to assist me.

Rec'd letter yesterday announcing the joy Anna has in beginning to keep house.

Jan 2, Fri. 1891
Cloudy, a few flakes of snow, clear not cold at night.

Some cattle wintering out. Marvin had milk in one breast and the other is gathered. Never heard of such a thing. He was born at 12:10/23 inst. Dec. 13, 1890

Attended Bishop's Priesthood meeting tonight. Some names were presented by Thos. Grover and others of persons to be advanced in the priesthood.

The whooping cough is about over.

Scarlet fever has been in D. Clawson's family and other families. The former, that is D. Clawson, does not belong to the church but has declared his intention to join.

In priesthood meeting I would have recommended Isaiah Stewart worthy to be ordained a teacher but after reforming for awhile he gave way to drink.

Jan 3, Sat. 1891
Rose this morning at 4:30, attended with a spirit of improvement. After doing part of my chores, I was about to study a subject for the M.S. Academy, Polysophical Society, when I made a resolve, stronger, perhaps than ever that I would seek to know the Lord's will as to my future mission. L But the way I begin is by being guided by what inspiration is given me and by seeking to keep one question in view, "Is it my duty or is it not my duty?" I believe that if I can do my duty at present then it will be made known to me what my next duty is, and if I can do that and so on, I shall be able to fulfill the mission I was sent here for.

I told Emma this and said I thought such a course would land me in some Eastern college or in Ger. on a mission or China or Japan on in the S.L. Academy (called L.D.S. college) or in a roller mill.

I think this way: What do I want to go to school more for? To fit myself to be more useful in the hands of the Lord. It is necessary for me to know whether this course in school is in keeping with my duty. Is it my duty or is it not. If I can do more good in some other sphere of duty, I desire to know. I am going to fast this morning and pray for aid.

Attended Stake priesthood meeting. Robert Hogg, Sr. opened by prayer. W. H. Dickson told me in meeting that he told Bro. Hogg that he, Bro. Hogg, would be called upon to open the meeting.

Jan. 4, 1891
Attended S. School.

Received license to be Supt. Of Morgan Religion Class, was the first in the ward. In 1902 I received license to be Religion Class supt and instructor in Georgetown ward, signed by Author H. Lund, Rudger Clawson, and Jos. M. Tanner. General Supt. Date of license, June 10, 1902. Date of license for 1901 was Oct. 30.

In 1915 as one of the Bishopric I am to look after religion Class. Sept. 19, 1915 attended Religion Class convention held in connection with Stake Conference. Sep 26 I spoke to Bp. Hayes to see if we would hold ward board meeting.

No snow. Weather mild as ever.

In Sunday School Supt. D. Robison asked two persons to write essays or speak as they liked next Sunday. Subj: How they like to come to Sun. School.

Isaiah Stewart expressed his disapproval to me of my speaking in Priesthood meeting Friday night about his being drunk. I explained why I did it and told him that persons should not speak of what occurred when outside. At night I presided in the meeting. Bros. D. Robison and being appointed to act in harmony with Bro. Geo. Heiner in conducting the meetings Sunday night as Bishop lived in Round Valley.

Jan.5, Mon. 1891
Went to Porterville after the cattle not gathered. Found some but did not have time to drive. Went up beyond Red Rock. Snowed about 4 inches.

Lectured in Polysophical Society of the M. S. Acad. on Physics.

Jan. 7, Wed. 1891
Brought 7 head of cattle. Attended Y.M.M.I.A.

Emma in reply to my inquiry said she was still of the opinion I ought to attend school.

Jan. 8, Thurs. 1891
Gave Wm. Rollo order on Z.C.M.I. for $5.00. Has stopped work. No grinding in the mill today. Arther E. Brewer, the miller, is to come to the mill at noon. I am going down the valley for to look for missing cattle.

Three or four inches of snow on the ground. Cold today but not extra.

I should insert about my mission from Oct. 1891 to Oct. 1893

LAND
C.R. Clark's entry should read: N.E. ¼ N.W. ¼ Sec. 15 and
S.E. ¼ of S.W. ¼ and
W. ½ S.E. ¼ Sec. 10
7.10 S.R. 43 E.B.M.
E.N.Austin, Surveyor

From surveyor's letter of June 12, 1902
A few days after the surveying.

Page 64 of the manuscript that should go right here is missing.

Aug. 22, Wed. 1894
Harvesting wheat in Morgan at a good rate. Sisters Annie, Sarah, and children and Eugene and Nathan are at Lake Como today at the voluntary encampment of the Farmington Home Guard of Utah.

Frank Knowlton is straightening fish hooks to spear fish. Came home later. No fish.

Joseph Clark is at this writing in Bear Lake. Alice Clark at Provo to take a course in Kindergarten, Mamie Clark to pass an examination there to teach school, Albert Robinson to take his second year's course.

Annie Waldron Clark is in Richville, Lawrence came over on Monday 20 inst. And I pulled his tooth on the lower right jaw, farthest one back. The first tooth I have pulled unless I have pulled some in childhood.

Mamie Clark, George, their Mother (Lucy) came about 11 P.M. The General of the Home Guard of Utah, Ottinger is to spend a day or two at Lake Como.

Aug. 23, 1894
Father and Susan came to Lake Como and I met them there while I was in uniform. The General and Staff gave a ball and Emma, Marvin, and I shook hands with Gov. West, Secy Richards.

Mamie went to teach school in Goshen and her mother came up the second time with Soyra to finish her dress cutting class lessons and left the same day. I and my family, nine of us, started on a trip north.

Sept 19-20-21-22-23, 1894
Camped in the yard of the Coop. Wagon and Machine Company at the invitation of Emma's Uncle E. F. Woolley. Hired a tent @ $ 1.00 per week.

Annie and children topped in Fairview and got some peaches. Camped near Willard.

Bought six large W. melons and two cantalope for 25 cents of a little girl by the roadside. At noon Annie's Valise was left at the side of the road where I nailed a shoe on the horse past Deweyville. Camped at Bro. Hobb's (a brother to Henry Hobbs) at Benson. Annie and Marion returned and obtained her valise hanging on the fence. Camped in the lane near Hyde Park.

1904

Apr. 1904
Feb cattle last day of season of feeding outside stock.

May 4 - 8, 1904
Planted garden, first in town perhaps to plant.

Have been turning cows on range but need hay at night.

Worked Pert first. Got pieces from saw mill to put around trees in front of house on sidewalk.

Rec'd trees, (Balm of Gilead) from Alma Hayes @ 10 cents - $2.50

Got oats from Joseph Hebdon to sow, gross 1560. Vernon went to run the disc harrow. First time I have used it this year. W.W. had used it about a week. Jno Barkdull want it tomorrow. Rained so I did not sow grain.

Bud got out on the range last night, Marvin not overtaking him went today and got him on 8 mile.

At night I go to administer to Mattie Johnson with Albert Bacon. She has had an operation .

Sowed Rye on ridge north of old creamery and covered it with the disc harrow with Jake, Bill, Dick and Bell. It was cold wind. I had overcoat on to keep warm. Vernon plowed on the higher part of same ridge with Bud and Champion. Marvin ran the disc while I sowed spring rye.

Drover But and Pert to take Emma to wait on Miss Johnson. Drove up with Marvin and Vernon to get the cows which had gone up in the field. Noticed snowdrift just nearly melted in the old creek channel in E.B. field above Alice's. Met with Bp Richards and Alma Hayes in Council. Decided to visit at their homes. The ones who imitated sacred things in last dance. Richard Payne, Clarence Hess, and song girls.

Brought cows to the coral down on the lot where we live. Having had them up to the barn all winter and fed hay till now. Though they have been out on the grass for a week.

May 9, 10, 11, 1904
Bishop Wright lectured tonight on Indian customs on the meeting house. Medicine word used by the Indians means mysterious and chiefly in a religious sense.

Assisted Geo. Sotham. I set out replacing those having died [apple trees] Wealthy, 7 Cuthess of Oldenberg, 7 Yellow transparent. Set out 80 Canadian poplars up the lane on my 20 acre lot. Ran the disc on the native soil north of rye patch after Francis King had been covering spring rye during the earlier part of the day.

Vernon and Collins Potterel repaired fence between the two creameries. Potterel had five days repairing fence down near the creamer. Francis King plows during the week. Vernon also plows and Monday the 16th he runs the disc to put in barley down below town where it is too cold and damp to ripen oats.

During part of the week I cleared the willows in the 20 acres and put wheat in there on Sat.

Sowed 25# peas, "Our First and Best" and they ripened about -----first in town, that is, those I did not water.

Tues. Aug. 22, 1904
Vernon and I left Montpelier with 3 cars of Norman Hayes sheep for Omaha to get free transportation both ways. 4 days. Bought 2 tickets in Omaha on Mo. P.R.R. and got to St. Louis about 8 A.M.

Sunday Aug. 28, 1904

Went to fair 4 days and returned this morning. M.C. Clark also at the fair.

Sept. 6-9, 1904
Emma and children and Marvin started Sept 5 for Teton in carriage.

I write to Mo. Pac. R.R. about my lost ticket.

Vernon mowing Swampy Meadow.

Ate dinner with Jno Hayes and went with him to see his father, sick with blood coming through him from stomach.

Second crop of rye is ripe but very poor crop. Frost out prevented kernels on the lower land where there was a heavy stand. Oats ripe in the valley now. Wheat ready in a few days. Second crop of lucern is being cut. Frost has turned some of the second. People busy now hauling lucern.

Sept 16 - 19, 1904
This date was on a postal from Emma at Victor saying she could have driven to Victor in 1-1/2 days if Mag had not balked an hour and a half and if she had not had to wait at the ferry two hours. Amy has a fine ten pound boy. Will return via Rexburg. I am glad she is so she and the children can see Snake River Valley and some of the people.
I was the first speaker in funeral of Bro. Black (72 yrs old)
Run a Black's binder on black's ranch. I gave Daisy for the binder of F.R. Bacon. Intend to let it out for half. Hauled hay on the meadow and Vernon moved down below the willows.

Oct. 1904
Went to Conference in Oct. with H.D. C. and W.W. C., and their wives. Returned with fruit. I drove Bud and Mag with carriage. Was in Morgan only a few days thinking I would return to Morgan with the horses in Dec. but Joseph coming up to try to prove up on his land changed my plan. I went with Joseph and E. B. up through Georgetown Canyon to Crow Creek helping them drive young stock to Star Valley to winter. They brought back beef and drove to Salt Lake Valley to sell. I had six head. I fed cattle here in Georgetown during the winter. The boys Vernon and Marvin milked a few cows and Willie Johnson milked almost eight for one cow's milk.

1905

May. 1905
Fred Bartchie took cows to pasture and milked for half leaving it three to milk.
Started for Star Valley, Marvin and Melvin coming with the carriage to get milk cows.

June, 1905
We are milking 27 cows counting four that are suckling. Agreed to plant 10 acres to beets and ten more if Jap labor can be obtained.

W.W., Vernon, and Marvin and I surveyed ditch sites from Hoff Springs.

Oct. 1905
Attended Special Priesthood meeting in Salt Lake Assembly Hall..

Nov. 1905
Commenced feeding calves in Georgetown. Vernon, Wm., and Edw. B. Started to Star Valley for the cattle to be fed in Georgetown till Jan. 20, then at Montpelier, 360. No. of my cattle Jan 20, 100 head.


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